Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Dr A K Singh

Emeritus Scientist,National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources, India

Keynote: SCIENTIFIC APPROACHES TOWARDS RAINBOW TROUT FARMING IN INDIAN HIMALAYAN REGION

Time : 10.00-10.45 am

Biography:

Abstract:

The mountainous regions in the Himalayan states of India is endowed with copious amounts of highly oxygenated pristine freshwater highly suitable for culturing rainbow trout, which is a robust and fast growing salmonid fish farmed across the globe. Eventually after its introduction in India in the early 20th century, rainbow trout is fast becoming the most remunerative coldwater fish that provides livelihood and food security to the hill population. The present annual rainbow trout production in India is nearly 842 tons from 62 government trout farms and 660 private trout production units distributed across the states of Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Sikkim, Arunachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand. Serial and parallel flow through raceway culture systems is widely used. In terms of seed and feed production capacity, there are 32 government affiliated rainbow trout hatcheries with an estimated production capacity of 13 million eyed ova and 3 well equipped feed mills with an installed capacity of nearly 10 tons per day. Considering the huge gap between the actual and potential trout production, the ICAR-Directorate of Coldwater Fisheries Research is undertaking concerted research and development efforts to expand and intensify rainbow trout production, in partnership with the concerned state fisheries departments. Spatial decision support system has been employed to generate GIS based site suitability maps for trout culture.  To minimize land and water usage in trout culture, water recirculation system has been developed on trial basis. Laying the base for genetic improvement programs, genetic variability in different rainbow trout stocks has been characterized using DNA marker technologies. Moreover, rainbow trout brood banking and triploid production trials have been initiated. Comprehensive disease surveillance is continually under taken and diagnostic/control methods are being developed. Cost-effective feeds with better feed conversion ratio have been developed and the use of sustainable feed ingredients is being evaluated. Farm operation and activities like fish seed transportation are being scientifically optimized. The concept of cluster farming modules and culture chains are also gradually introduced and promoted by sharing technical knowledge and science base culture technology that facilitate high returns on investment. All these multipronged strategies will stimulate vertical and horizontal expansion of trout production in India which will also help the neighbouring countries in advancing trout farming practices.

 

Keynote Forum

Dr. Pravin Kumar N

Senior Research Fellow, Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, India

Keynote: Studies on length groups and length-weight Relationship of Puffer fishes (Tetraodontidae) in the catches off, Andaman Islands, India.

Time :

Biography:

Abstract:

Puffer fish are commonly distributed in the tropics, but are relatively uncommon in temperate regions and completely absent from cold waters. These fishes are the second most poisonous vertebrate in the world. Puffer fishes are diverse group of aquatic organisms and are non-target species incidentally or accidentally caught by trawling in India. These fishes are  known  to  contain  a  toxin called  Tetrodotoxin  in  the  skin,  liver,  gonads  and  intestines, it is highly toxic to humans. Puffer fish poisoning is considered to be the common cause of fish poisoning along the Asian coast and local Puffer fish poisoning are also reported in Andaman Islands. In the Andaman waters, these animals are commonly found. In the South Andaman Sea, a total of 16 species belonging to the family tetraodontidae (13 species) and Diodontidae (3 Species) are reported. The identification of Tetraodontiformes is very difficult due to their analogous nature and their biological study in India is in insufficient level due to their poor taxonomic descriptions. Hence, they are treated as trash fish and dumped with other uneconomical fishes. Even though puffer fishes are toxic, they are considered as delicacy in many countries especially Japan. These countries investigate the food resource and gut content analysis of puffer fishes. These studies could provide essential information about nutrients requirements of puffer fishes, which are helpful for formulating the artificial feed for the fish cultivation commercially. In India, the utilization of liver lipids as sources of fish oil and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) from the puffer fish as a cheap and easily available source. In this study, to understand the general biology of Andaman puffer fishes with special reference on diet preferences and length-weight relationship. Ten species of puffer fishes belonging to two families and five genera including a new genera Chilomycterus reticulates (Linnaeus, 1758) were collected and identified from the coastal waters of Andaman Islands. The length-weight relationship and gut content analysis of nine local puffer fishes, The average length-weight relationship of nine species is depicted namely Arothron reticularis (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (n=53); Arothron immaculatus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (n=55); Arothron hispidus (Linnaeus, 1758) (n=53); Arothron nigropunctatus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (n=51); Arothron stellatus (Bloch & Schneider, 1801) (n=50); Chelodon patoca (Hamilton, 1822) (n=35); Diodon hystix (Linnaeus, 1758) (n=50); Diodon liturosus (Shaw 1804) (n= 49) and  Lagocephalus guentheri (Miranda-Riberio, 1915) (n=38) were calculated to be W=0.1599, W=0.1294, W=0.4614, W=0.0081, W=2.9841, W=0.091, W=0.4709 W=0.0982 and W=0.10605. The growth coefficient of these nine species was b>3, which showed positive allometric growth and the fish becomes heavier in relation to its length. Studied species collected from Andaman waters exhibited wide range of variations in body size (5.1-54cm) and weight (9-2247g). Gut content analysis indicated that puffer fishes are omnivorous since fragments of corals, sponges, algae, mollusks, rock oyster and fish are commonly found in their intestines. The general biology investigation reports provide the fundamental information about local puffer fish resources. In future, fully utilize the puffer fish resources from the Andaman Sea, the puffer fish should be a good candidate for mariculture in the near future. Apart from processing their flesh for human consumption, the viscera of puffer fish can be explored to produce the TTX. Due to its specific blocking action towards voltage gated sodium channel that can cease the transmission of action potential, TTX has the potential to develop as a drug lead candidate for local anesthetics or analgesics.

 

  • Aquaculture

Session Introduction

Akriti Regmi

Agriculture and Forestry University, Rampur, Chitwan, Nepal

Title: Aquaculture for Food Security, Poverty Alleviation and Nutrition of Ethnic Mushar Community in Nawalparasi, Nepal
Biography:

Abstract:

Mushar community is the traditional fishing community living  along the bank of Narayani River in Nawalparasi district of Nepal. They are landless and their livelihood solely depends on fishery activities. In recet years, due to sharp decline in fishery resources and current Government policy of restriction in fishing in the Narayani river near the National Park area, their livelihood is on threat. Two Community Forest User Group were formed involving 50 households and fish ponds were constructed in wetland of Community Forest in the Buffer Zone area with the assistance of Jatayu Restaurant (Vulture Conservation Project). The annual fish production, consumption and sale per household were 160.0, 30.8 and 125.1 kg, respectively with sold value of NRs. 33278.0 in 2017. Additional income were generated by producing vegetables in the pond dikes. The aquaculture activity helped to improve family nutrition and supplement income of the community as well as decreasing fishing pressure in the Narayani River. Development of Community Fish Production Groupss exclusively owned and managed by the women themselves helped in women’s empowerment through their improved access to and control over resources and increased roles in decision-making at both household and community levels.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

Zambia has abundant water resources that account for 40% of surface water in Central and Southern Africa (Zambia Development Agency 2011). Because of its abundant water resources, including rivers, lakes, swamps, floodplains and streams that make up about 145,194 km2 (Musumali et al. 2009), fisheries are important to Zambia’s national economy and contribute significantly to employment, income generation and food security (Mudenda 2009). Fish contributes about 55% of national average protein intake and about 3.8% of the national GDP (Musumali et al. 2009). The largest contribution to the GDP comes mostly from capture fisheries. About 300,000 people benefit directly/indirectly from the fisheries sector (Zambia Development Agency 2011) and for mostly poor people, fish is an important source of protein as other animal protein sources are expensive. The published and unpublished research literature on fish production and consumption in Zambia tends to support the view that there is, as yet untapped, potential for further production of farmed fish in the country that would decrease pressure on wild capture fishing. According to Longley et al. (2014), per capita fish supply in Zambia has declined by about 50%, from 12.59 kg/capita/year in the 1970s to 5.9 kg/capita/year (7.2 kg/capita/year if net imports are included) in 2014. The market demand for fish is currently bottomless however the aquaculture value chain is somewhat fragmented and uncoordinated to stimulated meaningful sectorial development.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dewi Syahidah completed her BSc in Fisheries Science from Brawijaya University in 1997 and MAppSc from JCU Australia in 2010. Her PhD research focused on assessing cell cultures to propagate crustacean viruses under the Australian Development Scholarships (ADS) scheme. Now she is joining Asian Fisheries Society-Fish Health Section (AFS-FHS) executive committee 2018-2020 and being a reviewer in some journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: A study was conducted to investigate the existence of an interferon (IFN) pathway in crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) using PCR and experimental exposure to α-interferon. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The experiment was set in a randomised block design with two recirculation tank systems (A and B) for four groups of adult crayfish (C. quadricarinatus) over a three-week period. The initial stocking density was 2 or 3 crayfish per tank. Within the first week, three groups in both systems were exposed by subcutaneous injection to alpha-interferon (CHO-derived) recombinant protein at different dosages per gram body weight (BW), namely: 100IU; 200IU, and 225IU (75 IU inoculated three times) whereas one group was used as the control.  All groups undertook a daily “righting-reflex test” within the period. Following the three-week trial, statistical analysis and a histopathological examination were conducted using a light microscope. In addition, PCR was performed on pleiopod tissues of healthy crayfish using decapod and two set designed primers from Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis). At the-day 21, all groups of injected crayfish showed an average day life shorter than the control groups. Findings: Statistical analyses showed no significant difference for the mean of righting reflex time and the last righting reflex time across the four treatments and the two systems (F= 0.963, df(3,38), p>0.05, p>0.05 and F=1.211, df(3,38), p>0.05, respectively). The Kaplan-Meier test showed the cumulative survival in the three treatment groups of crayfish was shorter than that in the control group. Conclusion & Significance: There was a tendency that the interferon used in the experiment was toxic to the crayfish. The light microscopic observation demonstrated signs of mixed of infection from bacteria, fungi and viruses, indicating general depressed health of the crayfish rather than the effect of the injection. The PCR primers effectively worked during the amplification of DNA from pleiopods. Somewhat similar characteristics between obtained sequences and other crustacean sequences, including Chinese mitten crab (E. sinensis), Astacus astacus, and Procambarus clarkii did not support the idea that an interferon (IFN) pathway existed in crayfish. However, this present study tends to support the idea that interferon (IFN) pathways within crustaceans might have diverged or lost during evolution.

 

  • Environmental Effects in Aquaculture and Fishery

Session Introduction

Dr. Amita Saxena

Professor in College of Fisheries at GBPUAT Pantnagar, India

Title: Study of Biodiversity and Microbial Load in Water of River Kosi and Sharda
Biography:

Dr. Amita Saxena Professor in College of Fisheries at GBPUAT Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, India was born at Aurangabad (Maharastra). She took her all degrees B.Sc. (Hons), MSc and Ph.D. in Zoology (fish biochemistry) from CCS Meerut University. She always ranked on top. She achieved 100% marks in marine fish keeping and tropical fish keeping diplomas from England, UK.

 She gave significant contribution to Fisheries/Zoology/ Aquatic Science, her researches include Nutrition and Biotechnology. Her debut in designed pearl culture in Uttarnakhand (Hill State) is  first and praise worthy and awarded by the GBPUA&T, Pantnagar. She has visited India and abroad to have practical experiences and clear conception about areas, their developments,education, culture, traditions of the people, their needs ,especially aquatic resources of fresh water and coastal waters.  Her researches are authenticated by  publication .She wrote  several books ,research papers, reviews,(in indexed  national and international journals) ,reports, theses and delivered many invited lecture in National and International conferences are also important to her credit . She taught ,motivated ,popularized and transferred scientific technologies on  biodiversity conservation of natural resources and fisheries /aquaculture to the students/common people/farmers and need  based persons .through literature, visits, lectures, radio and TV talks. She is involved in improving the rural economy of poor people through fisheries &  allied sectors, She explored the potential of aquatic resources to acquire scientific knowledge for teaching and used her research & training skills for sustainable development ,food ,health  and  environment security for better livelihood .Through  innovative  ideas of teaching and skill development  trainings, women /girls ,socio economic status  enhanced that leads to growth in GDP and NATION Building.

 

Abstract:

The present study was undertaken in Kosi and Sharda Rivers of Kumaun, of Uttarakhand for fish diversity, qualitative and qualitative estimation of plankton and microbial load were analyzed from the period of November 2015 to April 2016. A total of the occurrence of 7 species of fishes belonging to 4 families Cyprinidae, Sisoridae, Channidae, Belonidae were reported in the Kosi River. A total of 11 species belonging to 4 families Cyprinidae, Sisoridae, Botidae, Channidae were recorded during the present investigation from the Sharda River. Among the collected species, family Cyprinidae was most abundant in both the rivers. Some of the fish species were found very rare in the rivers, which might be due to various anthropogenic factors. The density of phytoplankton population varies between 0.9 and 2.1 ×104 units/l from Kosi River and between 1.2 and 3.5 ×104 units/l from Sharda River. In Kosi River zooplankton observed in ranged between 47 and113 organism/l and in Sharda River value ranged between 58 and 105 organism/l throughout the study period. Average bacterial abundance was 4.33±0.60 CFU×103 ml-1 and 3.2±0.4 CFU×103 ml-1 in Kosi and Sharda Rivers respectively. Presence of various phytoplankton and zooplankton although there were no sign of problems like eutrophication. Studied were indicated that both river water were fit for aquatic organism, such as fishes because of there were plenty of food.

 

  • Aquaculture Feed

Session Introduction

Adewole, A.M.

Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, Adekunle Ajasin University, Akungba -Akoko, Nigeria.

Title: Performance and Production Economics of Clarias gariepinus fed Erythromycin meal diet as additive
Biography:

Abstract:

Background: One of the paramount challenges to the use of antibiotics in aquaculture for fish health and growth promotion is the difficulty in calculation of the appropriate dosage and drug misuse. These posed threats to human health and environmental safety. This study evaluated erythromycin supplemented meal diets on the growth, physiological response and production economics of juvenile Clarias gariepinus.                          

Methodology: Juveniles C. gariepinus (n=20, mean weight: 10.94±0.02g) were fed twice daily at 5% body weight in triplicates for 12 weeks in a completely randomized design with the different erythromycin inclusion levels: ERM1 (0%) (Control diet); ERM2 (0.1%); ERM3 (0.5%). Mean Weight Gain (MWG), Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR), Pack Cell Volume (PCV), Total Protein (TP), Hepatosomatic (HSI) index, histopathological examination of the liver and evaluation of Profitability Index (PI) were determined. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. 

 Results: Highest MWG (54.08±2.34g/fish) and least FCR (2.53±0.01) were recorded in fish fed ERM3 diet; while fish fed ERMI diet had least MWG (23.93±1.30g/fish) and highest FCR (4.448±0.07) respectively. The highest PCV (28.00±0.58%) was from fish fed ERM2 diet and the least value of 25.43±0.22% was from fish fed ERM1 diet. The TP was significantly different among the fish fed Erythromycin meal diets, with the highest value of 7.83±0.03g/l from fish fed ERM2 diet and the least value of 6.30±0.15g/l observed from fish fed ERM1 diet. The highest HSI (0.87±0.19%) was recorded in fish fed ERMI diet. The liver of Clarias gariepinus fed ERM3 diet showed vacuolation of hepatocytes. The highest PI (6.13) was from the fish fed ERM3 diets and the least (5.04) was from fish fed ERM1 diet.

Conclusion: Inclusion of 0.5% of Eythromycin in Clarias gariepinus diet gave the most improved growth and profitability, with little effect on the fish health integrity.